The Essel group planning to adopt a revenue sharing model for developing smart cities

The Essel group is planning to adopt a revenue sharing model for developing smart cities, Chairman Subhas Chandra said . the Essel group is involved in diverse sectors such as education, wellness, infrastructure, manufacturing, gold refining and financial services.

The group has already signed a memorandum of understanding with the Madhya Pradesh Government for developing five smart cities. A month ago, it moved the West Bengal Government to develop a smart city in the state.

The group hopes to be able to showcase its first smart city within two years of signing a definite agreement with the Madhya Pradesh Government. Essel would take up only cities with a population of over five lakh for this initiative, he said, adding that a smart city was all about giving uninterrupted services to citizens through smart governance and better surveillance. Much before the word smart city gained coinage, Essel had developed smart utilities as an integrated utilities brand for consumer-centric service-oriented brand, he said. Pointing out that West Bengal offered immense business potential in sectors such as roads, hydel energy, and power distribution, he said Essel was trying to help the government address certain policy issues.

Government Looking forward for Private investors in Smart cities Projects

 


India is on the way to its latest projects Smart cities. As this is not a mere task and needed a huge budget, the Governments now looking for for the private investors to invest for the said projects.

“A large amount of money has to come from the private sector for the development of ‘smart cities’ for which the ministry is studying the ways and means on how to attract private investments,” MoUD Secretary Shankar Agarwal said.

Although the private investors were willing to take business risks, they would not be eager to bear political perils. “Their investments should be safe and also fetch returns,” he said.

“Private investors may participate by taking a part of equity or in any other form. We will be able to come out with the guidelines in two to three months time,” he told reporters at the MCC Chamber of Commerce here . The Modi government has proposed to build 100 smart cities that would be identified by the Centre at the suggestion of the state governments. The Centre would also extend finance to the states in setting up the smart cities, he said.

West Bengal Urban Development Secretary Debasish Sen said that the New Town locality at Rajarhat near the metropolis was fit to be developed into a smart city.

First Smart City Will House 6 Lakh People By 2031

First Smart City Will House 6 Lakh People By 2031

First Smart City Will House 6 Lakh People By 2031

The first smart city coming up at a cost of ‘40,000 crore will house 6 lakh people by 2031

The greenfield city, expected to attract investments worth ‘40,000 crore, will house six lakh people by 2031, according to a senior official of the Naya Raipur development authority (NRDA). Of the anticipated aggregate investment, Rs6,000 crore will come from the state government. The city plan has been prepared by a consortium of Delhi-based Consultancy Engineering Services (CES) and Singapore-based PWG.

The keywords for the proposed city are sustainability and inclusiveness. The land use in Naya Raipur is one of best in the country, says the official. Close to 26 percent of the land will have green vegetation cover and it would also include three lakes and a jungle safari. Another 26 percent of the land will be used for residential area, 23 percent for public and semi-public purposes and the rest for transport, commercial and industrial use. Based on the transit-oriented development (TOD) concept, the city roads are 100 metre wide and the public transportation is based on bus rapid transport system (BRTS).

Architecturally, the city follows gridiron pattern of urban planning in which the streets run perpendicular to each other forming a grid. Also seen in the design of streets in Harappa and Mohenjodaro civilisation, the street pattern is pedestrian friendly. The city has three long spine roads on the north-south axis.

The city is being readied in three phases, or layers as NRDA calls them, covering a total area of 8,013 hectare or 75 sq km. In phase one, most of the core city structures will be put in place. This includes 75 km of road network, all government buildings, including the capitol complex which will house the secretariat and the legislative assembly, residential sectors, hospitals, central business districts (CBD), a five-star hotel, a cricket stadium and a knowledge park housing educational research institutions. This phase has been virtually completed. The secretariat has already shifted from Raipur. The second phase will witness development of periphery zone, which has been mostly left green. In the last phase the NRDA is expected to develop the airport zone. –

Multi-stakeholder participation key to success of smart cities plan

Multi-stakeholder participation key to success of smart cities plan

Multi-stakeholder participation key to success of smart cities plan

“If we want sustainable growth we have to care for the weaker sections. That is why this government is focussed on creating smart cities, which would provide economic opportunities to all. This would create an environment for inclusive development,” Shankar Aggarwal, secretary, ministry of urban development said.

Aggarwal was making a presentation on ‘Policies of India’s urban future: the 100 smart cities programme’ at the second and last day of Urban Age conference organised by the London School of Economics and Deutsche Bank. The government has initiated key initiatives in this regard. Firstly, the government has initiated clean India movement; it aims to have a clean country by 2019.

This would require a change in the mind set, he said. Second is rejuvenation of heritage towns such as Ajmer, Agra and Varanasi. These cities would be developed in a way that the heritage remains intact. “No doubt, we get agitated in absence of basic civic services in these towns,” he said. Third is urban renewal of 500 cities and fourth is creating 100 smart cities.

These cities would leverage information and communication technology for better governance. “But ICT would just be a thin layer. The city will have few core infrastructural elements. First is institutional infrastructure,” he said. This would mean all services would be delivered online. All information will be put online. These initiatives will be aimed at increasing citizen engagement. Second is civic infrastructure.

This would include putting in place adequate water supply, sanitation, garbage and sewage treatment, optical fibre connectivity, mobility systems, which would reduce travel time, he said. If all stakeholders — government, industry, academia, civil society – work together these cities could be transformed in to smarter urban spaces, he said. The idea is to bring peace, progress and prosperity in the society, he added.

3 sub-cities in Varanasi’s makeover

3 sub-cities in Varanasi’s makeover

3 sub-cities in Varanasi’s makeover

Government has finalied a smart city plan for Varanasi, in Uttar Pradesh. Varanasi makeover has become a top priority for the urban development ministry. Varanasi will be developed as a ‘smart city’ with cooperation from Kyoto, the Japanese ‘smart city’ which is a confluence of heritage and modernity.

According to the ministry’s proposed plan, accessed by dna, the city’s heritage structures be restored even as its infrastructure is upgraded. Three sub cities — Sarnath, Banaras Hindu University and Airport City — will be carved out as smart sub-cities, interconnected by a network of flyovers. The idea is to ensure that commuting from one sub-city to another does not take more than 30 minutes.

The proposed transport infrastructure also includes a metro rail. An IT park, a skill development centre and an IT research and development centre are also mooted.
The ministry plans to restore the Sarnath Temple, the Jain temples of Varanasi with help from the Archaeological Survey of India. The presentation also talks about the International Centre for Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism studies.
An academy for music and dance and a school of Oriental learning have also been proposed in the smart plan. To promote art and culture, three museums (one each dedicated to textiles, culture and tourism) and a Bhojpuri film festival are on the cards.
The river beautification involves the redevelopment of a 100 ghats in Varanasi. An inland waterway between Allahabad to Kolkata is also proposed.

The plan is likely to be launched on December 25, former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s brithday. The entire makeover is expected to be complete in three phases, ending by 2019.

Intel to take initiative in India’s Smart Cities initiative

Intel  to take initiative  in India's Smart Cities initiative

Intel to take initiative in India’s Smart Cities initiative

American multinational corporation Intel Corporation is looking forward to take initiative in India Government’s Smart Cities Plan. The technology giant is also talking to technology providers to collaborate for the projects, Debjani Ghosh, vice-president, sales & marketing group, managing director, Intel South Asia said according to economics times.

She said, “From management to security to analytics, we have it all on our hardware platform. We provide System Integrators with very compelling platform and they can build these solutions further.”

In the interview by ET she was asked ” Do you foresee execution as a challenge for the initiative in India? ” She answered, “Execution has always been a challenge in India. This is one of those cases where the strongest political will is required to make it happen. I have never seen such strong political will. You will see some results.”

Chennai and Bengaluru among world 100 Resilient Cities network

Chennai and Bengaluru among world 100 Resilient Cities network

Chennai and Bengaluru among world 100 Resilient Cities network

Indian two cities namely Chennai and Bengaluru have joined the ‘100 Resilient Cities’ network, dedicated to helping cities around the world become more resilient to physical, social and economic challenges, for demonstrating a commitment to building their capacities in tackling 21st century issues.

The announcement of the incorporation of the 35 new cities was made on December 2 at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Urbans Resilience Summit in Singapore. Besides Chennai and Bengaluru, the other South Asian cities included in the network are Deyang (China), Huangshi (China), Phnom Penh (Cambodia), Singapore and Toyama (Japan).

A total of 331 application were submitted for the said event. Each city was asked to present a clear and compelling description of its major challenges and its approach to decrease vulnerabilities. 100RC network, is pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation, New York.

After the review of the applications, a panel of judges including African Development Bank president Donald Kaberuka, president and CEO of the Asia Society Josette Sheeran, and former president of Costa Rica Jose Maria Figueres, recommended the set of 35 member cities.

According to the network, Chennai was chosen for developing coordinate disaster response plans to protect low-lying coastal areas in the face of a high flood risk.

Chennai is making efforts to learn from past events and is continuing to provide best-practice solutions to other regions, it said. The city is also budgeting resources to improve waste collection to minimise its impact as an environmental threat and during flooding.

On Bengaluru, it said that the city has a strong investment in the tech support industry but disruptions to infrastructure such as those caused by seasonal monsoon flooding can have serious negative consequences for industry and the city’s economic stability.

Chennai and Bengaluru among world 100 Resilient Cities network

Indian two cities namely Chennai and Bengaluru have joined the ‘100 Resilient Cities’ network, dedicated to helping cities around the world become more resilient to physical, social and economic challenges, for demonstrating a commitment to building their capacities in tackling 21st century issues.

The announcement of the incorporation of the 35 new cities was made on December 2 at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Urbans Resilience Summit in Singapore. Besides Chennai and Bengaluru, the other South Asian cities included in the network are Deyang (China), Huangshi (China), Phnom Penh (Cambodia), Singapore and Toyama (Japan).

A total of 331 application were submitted for the said event. Each city was asked to present a clear and compelling description of its major challenges and its approach to decrease vulnerabilities. 100RC network, is pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation, New York.

After the review of the applications, a panel of judges including African Development Bank president Donald Kaberuka, president and CEO of the Asia Society Josette Sheeran, and former president of Costa Rica Jose Maria Figueres, recommended the set of 35 member cities.

According to the network, Chennai was chosen for developing coordinate disaster response plans to protect low-lying coastal areas in the face of a high flood risk.

Chennai is making efforts to learn from past events and is continuing to provide best-practice solutions to other regions, it said. The city is also budgeting resources to improve waste collection to minimise its impact as an environmental threat and during flooding.

On Bengaluru, it said that the city has a strong investment in the tech support industry but disruptions to infrastructure such as those caused by seasonal monsoon flooding can have serious negative consequences for industry and the city’s economic stability.

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