IIT-Bombay Techfest, to help Design Smart Cities

Techfest, festival of IIT-Bombay will provide an opportunity to contribute towards the smart city plan. Techfest is associated with many government organisations like Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority, City and Industrial Development Corporation of Maharashtra and Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Development Corporation (DMICDC).

Mantry said that ideas presented by the participants shall be considered for implementation in the development of new smart cities along the DMICDC, a Central government undertaking.

The smart city challenge is a unique initiative to engage the youth in the development of their city and prosperity of its citizens. Techfest is slated for January 2-4 at the Powai campus here.

“It aims at providing a strong sharing platform and offers a unique opportunity to get involved in the development of smart cities to exchange ideas and foster the new integrated approaches in India,” Techfest spokesperson Aman Mantry said.

First 3 smart cities to be completed in 2019

Modi’s vision for advanced cities that benefit from the latest technology has finally begun to take shape with the Ministry of Urban Development identifying almost all the locations where they will be built as well as existing cities that are to be remodelled on these lines.

This done, the ministry has asked the 22 states where the programme will be implemented to send detailed project reports so a final blueprint can be outlined.

Describing the scheme, officials of the urban development ministry say they plan to set up seven smart cities each in Gujarat, Kerala, Rajasthan and Karnataka.
Modi’s constituency Varanasi, they added, is among the six cities identified in Uttar Pradesh for the smart makeover

Five years A senior ministry official said the government has set 2019 as the deadline to deliver the first three smart cities, all of which will be built as part of the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC).

The DMIC is a project the government aims to build as a ‘global manufacturing and trading hub’. These smart cities are Dholera, Shendra-Bidkin and Global City.
Overall, seven smart cities will be set up between Delhi and Mumbai under the DMIC project, which is being built in partnership with the government of Japan.
There are at least three more industrial corridors along which new cities are being built: Amritsar- Kolkata, Bangalore-Chennai and Chennai-Visakhapatnam. Besides, states have been asked to identify cities along the Amritsar-Kolkata corridor.

Delhi to grow faster than London

Delhi’s projected increase in per capita income is one of the largest among a group of global cities including London, New York and Tokyo between 2012 and 2030. According to a report released by London School of Economics (LSE) and Alfred Herrhausen Society, Delhi’s average annual gross value added (GVA, measure of value of products and services produced in a city) growth in the metro area would be 7 percent. In the same duration, London would have 2.8 percent, Lagos 6.6 percent and Tokyo 1.1 percent of GVA growth.

The study on eight cities — Delhi, London, Bogota, Tokyo, Lagos, New York, Istanbul and Berlin — was released at Urban Age Conference organised by the renowned varsity and the society, which is a corporate social responsibility (CSR) wing of Deutsche Bank. It is interesting to note here that the study has found Delhi safer than New York. In terms of number of murders per one lakh population, Delhi stands at 2.7 and New York at 5.6. Bogota (a Latin American city) tops the list, with16.1 homicides per one lakh population.
The population of the Delhi metro area over the same period would only grow by two percent a year compared to Lagos at 6.4 percent per year. Tokyo would actually shrink by 0.1 percent. Delhi, the study found, is also one of the most denser cities among the group.
“Despite its relatively low-rise urban landscape, Delhi has an extremely high average density of built up area of 19,698 people per square kilometre, nearly twice the levels for wider New York metro area (which at 11,531 people/sq km includes high-rise Manhattan) and Tokyo with 11,025 people/sq km,” the report said.
As a result,

Delhi has only two square metres of green space per person. “Istanbul fares even worse with one square metre person while lower density London and Berlin, with front and back gardens and extensive parks, have a generous 36 square metres and Berlin 39 sq metres respectively,” the report said. Delhi still has a high level of inequality, measured by the GINI Index.

The lower value of index signifies greater level of social equality; the higher value indicates greater inequality. “While London has an index of 3.6 and Berlin 2.9, Delhi has a relatively high figure of 6.0, yet lower than Lagos at 6.4 and many other African and Latin American cities,” the report said.

The Essel group planning to adopt a revenue sharing model for developing smart cities

The Essel group is planning to adopt a revenue sharing model for developing smart cities, Chairman Subhas Chandra said . the Essel group is involved in diverse sectors such as education, wellness, infrastructure, manufacturing, gold refining and financial services.

The group has already signed a memorandum of understanding with the Madhya Pradesh Government for developing five smart cities. A month ago, it moved the West Bengal Government to develop a smart city in the state.

The group hopes to be able to showcase its first smart city within two years of signing a definite agreement with the Madhya Pradesh Government. Essel would take up only cities with a population of over five lakh for this initiative, he said, adding that a smart city was all about giving uninterrupted services to citizens through smart governance and better surveillance. Much before the word smart city gained coinage, Essel had developed smart utilities as an integrated utilities brand for consumer-centric service-oriented brand, he said. Pointing out that West Bengal offered immense business potential in sectors such as roads, hydel energy, and power distribution, he said Essel was trying to help the government address certain policy issues.

Government Looking forward for Private investors in Smart cities Projects

 


India is on the way to its latest projects Smart cities. As this is not a mere task and needed a huge budget, the Governments now looking for for the private investors to invest for the said projects.

“A large amount of money has to come from the private sector for the development of ‘smart cities’ for which the ministry is studying the ways and means on how to attract private investments,” MoUD Secretary Shankar Agarwal said.

Although the private investors were willing to take business risks, they would not be eager to bear political perils. “Their investments should be safe and also fetch returns,” he said.

“Private investors may participate by taking a part of equity or in any other form. We will be able to come out with the guidelines in two to three months time,” he told reporters at the MCC Chamber of Commerce here . The Modi government has proposed to build 100 smart cities that would be identified by the Centre at the suggestion of the state governments. The Centre would also extend finance to the states in setting up the smart cities, he said.

West Bengal Urban Development Secretary Debasish Sen said that the New Town locality at Rajarhat near the metropolis was fit to be developed into a smart city.

First Smart City Will House 6 Lakh People By 2031

First Smart City Will House 6 Lakh People By 2031

First Smart City Will House 6 Lakh People By 2031

The first smart city coming up at a cost of ‘40,000 crore will house 6 lakh people by 2031

The greenfield city, expected to attract investments worth ‘40,000 crore, will house six lakh people by 2031, according to a senior official of the Naya Raipur development authority (NRDA). Of the anticipated aggregate investment, Rs6,000 crore will come from the state government. The city plan has been prepared by a consortium of Delhi-based Consultancy Engineering Services (CES) and Singapore-based PWG.

The keywords for the proposed city are sustainability and inclusiveness. The land use in Naya Raipur is one of best in the country, says the official. Close to 26 percent of the land will have green vegetation cover and it would also include three lakes and a jungle safari. Another 26 percent of the land will be used for residential area, 23 percent for public and semi-public purposes and the rest for transport, commercial and industrial use. Based on the transit-oriented development (TOD) concept, the city roads are 100 metre wide and the public transportation is based on bus rapid transport system (BRTS).

Architecturally, the city follows gridiron pattern of urban planning in which the streets run perpendicular to each other forming a grid. Also seen in the design of streets in Harappa and Mohenjodaro civilisation, the street pattern is pedestrian friendly. The city has three long spine roads on the north-south axis.

The city is being readied in three phases, or layers as NRDA calls them, covering a total area of 8,013 hectare or 75 sq km. In phase one, most of the core city structures will be put in place. This includes 75 km of road network, all government buildings, including the capitol complex which will house the secretariat and the legislative assembly, residential sectors, hospitals, central business districts (CBD), a five-star hotel, a cricket stadium and a knowledge park housing educational research institutions. This phase has been virtually completed. The secretariat has already shifted from Raipur. The second phase will witness development of periphery zone, which has been mostly left green. In the last phase the NRDA is expected to develop the airport zone. –

Multi-stakeholder participation key to success of smart cities plan

Multi-stakeholder participation key to success of smart cities plan

Multi-stakeholder participation key to success of smart cities plan

“If we want sustainable growth we have to care for the weaker sections. That is why this government is focussed on creating smart cities, which would provide economic opportunities to all. This would create an environment for inclusive development,” Shankar Aggarwal, secretary, ministry of urban development said.

Aggarwal was making a presentation on ‘Policies of India’s urban future: the 100 smart cities programme’ at the second and last day of Urban Age conference organised by the London School of Economics and Deutsche Bank. The government has initiated key initiatives in this regard. Firstly, the government has initiated clean India movement; it aims to have a clean country by 2019.

This would require a change in the mind set, he said. Second is rejuvenation of heritage towns such as Ajmer, Agra and Varanasi. These cities would be developed in a way that the heritage remains intact. “No doubt, we get agitated in absence of basic civic services in these towns,” he said. Third is urban renewal of 500 cities and fourth is creating 100 smart cities.

These cities would leverage information and communication technology for better governance. “But ICT would just be a thin layer. The city will have few core infrastructural elements. First is institutional infrastructure,” he said. This would mean all services would be delivered online. All information will be put online. These initiatives will be aimed at increasing citizen engagement. Second is civic infrastructure.

This would include putting in place adequate water supply, sanitation, garbage and sewage treatment, optical fibre connectivity, mobility systems, which would reduce travel time, he said. If all stakeholders — government, industry, academia, civil society – work together these cities could be transformed in to smarter urban spaces, he said. The idea is to bring peace, progress and prosperity in the society, he added.

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